Publisher FAQ

Q. What can FGL.com do for me?

Q. What do I give up to use this site?

Q. I need a game in a hurry. Can you help?

Q. How do I sign up as a sponsor/publisher?

Q. How do I delete my active bids? I've already purchased similar games, and do not want to purchase any more.

Q. I notice you ask for a commission on deals made here. Who pays the commission, how much is it, and how do we pay?

Q. But I'm a developer *and* a publisher!

Q. So I need a "High Score API". What's that?

Q. Some games are marked as needing "wmode set to 'direct'". What does that mean?


Q. What can FGL.com do for me?

A. We give you access to a library of games looking to be published -- many of them 100% complete and ready for use! We make it easy to find the games you need: our library is fully searchable and new games are uploaded daily.

[faqQ]Q. What types of games are on FGL.com

A. FGL.com supports games from all technologies, platforms, and marketplaces. (iOS, Android, Flash, and all mobile and web marketplaces, etc...)


Q. What do I give up to use this site?

A. Nothing! Our job is to help you find games to publish or license, not to get in your way. You retain full control over the licensing or purchase deals that you make. The only thing we ask in return is a small commission (10%) on any deals you make here. The commission can be paid by you or the developer.


Q. I need a game in a hurry. Can you help?

A. One of our most popular services is the "No-Hassle Game Shop". Games listed in this area have well-defined licensing options available for a flat fee. For example, you may pay a small amount for a branded, site-locked version of the game, slightly more for a version with no external links, and so forth. If you need a game for your website in a hurry, the No-Hassle Game Shop is the perfect place to start your search! Note that these games have already been released and only have non-exclusive licenses available.

If you are looking for unreleased games, you can search for games in "Last Call" or "Quick Auction." Games in these areas are looking to accept an offer quickly.


Q. How do I sign up as a sponsor/publisher?

A. Signing up as a sponsor is quick and easy. Just head over to the sponsor sign-up page and create an account. Please make certain to identify your company and website clearly: for the security of our developers, we request that sponsors are associated with a game company in good standing that has been in business for at least six months. If you represent a newer company, we'll be happy to accept a small escrow until we can get to know you better.

We will contact you as quickly as possible after you create your account, and once you are approved you'll have our extensive library of games and developers at your fingertips!


Q. How do I delete my active bids? I've already purchased similar games, and do not want to purchase any more.

A. On the "My Bids" page click the bid amount you want to cancel and then click "Cancel Bid." Please note that you do not normally need to cancel bids manually unless you want to terminate a bid abruptly. The system will clean out your bids on a regular basis.


Q. I notice you ask for a commission on deals made here. Who pays the commission, how much is it, and how do we pay?

A. Either party can pay the commission, which is 10% of the deal. Sometimes the publisher will choose to pay the commission on top of the offer, so that the developer gets 100% of the offer.


Q. But I'm a developer *and* a publisher!

A. No problem! Publisher and developer accounts have slightly different functionality to better meet the needs of each group. So your best bet if you are both a developer and a publisher of games is to create two accounts -- one as a developer and one as a publisher. Once both accounts created, you can easily link them together so that you can seamlessly experience all the functionality FGL.com has to offer. (Linking accounts is an option under the "account" tab on your menu.)

Q. So I need a "High Score API". What's that?

A. From the developer's point of view, a High Score API is a piece of code that they integrate into their game. It then calls to a server to store the high scores for the game. (The server might be coded in PHP, or any other web development language.)

If you write your own High Score API, you will need to write both the client code and the server code (in PHP or some other web language such as Java or .NET). Remember that you will need a robust host server. If your published game is a big hit and spreads virally, it can generate millions of plays in the first month, which will overwhelm and incapacitate smaller servers, free webhosts, and sometimes even large, powerful custom server boxes -- if they're not optimized well.

An alternative to writing your own high score system is to use a 3rd-party API, such as GamerSafe. These don't store any data in your personal database; they store the data remotely on their 3rd-party servers. (This is a good thing if you're worried about your server being taken out too much traffic.)

While these 3rd-party APIs don't store the scores in your database, GamerSafe has a special API that your website can use to retrieve the high scores from their database and display them. That way you can let someone else deal with the potential bandwidth costs, and still have scoreboards on your own site. It's not quite as flexible as doing it yourself, but it can be simpler and a bit safer. They have example PHP scripts that can get you set up quickly.

FGL runs GamerSafe (GamerSafe.com), and it offers a lot of features, plus it has no ads or costs.


Q. Some games are marked as needing "wmode set to 'direct'". What does that mean?

A. The newest version of Flash Player supports advanced 3D features. To make these work in some browsers, the website hosting the game needs to have a special HTML parameter added to the web page.

When you embed the game on your website, you just need to specify that the "wmode" parameter should be "direct". We can't tell you exactly how you would do this on your game portal, because it will depend on which CMS and which JavaScript libraries you are using. (If in doubt, look for a section that lets you specify "Flash Player Parameters".) It's usually very simple to set, and the end result is that an extra line of code is added to the webpage that players see.

(Note that if you're testing this, the behavior differs from browser to browser. For instance, IE9 under Windows 7 often doesn't need this setting, but FireFox under Windows 7 does. Each browser and operating system will be different, but the universally safe thing to do is set it to 'direct'.)